i5 or i7?

Hi

I am wondering which processor will be good for running BoinxTV. We recently made an order for an iMac and had configured it with a 3.5ghz i7 processor. Today Apple announced some new iMacs and so have done a free upgrade on the main specs (we are now receiving a retina iMac rather than the standard). However this means they have put the processor now as a 3.5ghz i5. We are planning on doing quite a bit of filming using BoinxTV and so want good performance as well as something that will last.

Any thoughts on this?

Thanks

Perhaps to rephrase the question. Are there any benefits of the way an i7 processor works for boinxtv v’s an i5 processor?

I know this is an old thread …

Same question here … for a bare bones static two video source into mimoLive setup (no transitions) does i7 make a difference? We will obviously try to buy the best machines we can mid-2012 or later. I am preferring 11" for easiest transport.

We are considering buying up to 5 more MacBook Airs for mimoLive production so cost is an issue. We see lots of 2012 or later i5’s but not so many cost-effective i7’s on eBay.

  • i5 vs i7? The most common and east expensive 2012 sytems are i5 Ivy-Bridge 1.7GHZ.
  • memory … most systems are 4GB, which is lower than current requirements - but we are using a static MimoLive set up so I think we can get by with 4GB.
  • obviousely newer graphics cards are better … most of what we are seeing is Intel HD Graphics 4000 sharing memory with the system.
  • we’ll be using external flash drives for produced MiMolive video storage

Background
We’ve been asked to support a conference event with up to 7 simultaneous break outs and we want to produce videos from all 7. We normally support up to 3 breakouts and we have good hardware for that.

In this case we will equip each room with two Macbook Air’s … one on the podium with PPT/Keynote with HDMI extender/splitter to the projector and back to the second Air for mimoLive production computer where mimoLive will have two video inputs from two HDMI-USB frame grabbers - one from the camera and one a duplicate of the projector’s feed.

We expect most of these sessons to not be manned by technical folks so we’ll set mimoLive up with picture in picture and leave it be. Volunteers might adjust audio volume or move the camera but that’s it.

We will post-event edit presentor full screen in favor of PIP as we always capture the full-screen presentor and mixed audio on the camera’s flash card.

@mimolive@deansuhr.us This is an exciting project and I understand the need for being cost effective – after all, making it easy and accessible is the prime goal of mimoLive.

It would be really interesting to see if the MacBook Air 11 inch 2012 model can pull it off, but I can’t tell you. The critical thing is probably not the i5 or i7 but the internal bandwidth and the need for decoding/encoding video. I’m not sure that this model has an H.264 hardware encoder. If it does not, an i7 would help a little.

I would not recommend using USB frame grabbers. Those are definitely using too much processing power. My gut feeling is that you may be able to pull off using two BMD Mini Recorders at 720p30.

Thanks @“Oliver (Boinx)” . As best I can tell the MacBook Air’s from mid-2012 onward have hardware h.264 encoding capabilties.

I’m curious about the frame grabbers. BMD comes in though Thunderbolt – we’ll use that for the video, the USB grabbers for realtively static PowerPoint. Can you elaborate on the Mac processing power required for these two different input methods? Isn’t it the same data, but perhaps coming in at different rates? Are BMD frames already encoded? Do frames from a USB frame grabber require extra processing on the laptop?

I’m presuming by keeping MimoLive static (no fades, titles, etc), with one “live” presentor video and one mostly-static PPT input that we are minimizing the MimoLive demands on these older CPU’s.

We’ll keep you posted on how this project proceeds.

Thx!

@mimolive@deansuhr.us

I’m curious about the frame grabbers. BMD comes in though Thunderbolt – we’ll use that for the video, the USB grabbers for realtively static PowerPoint. Can you elaborate on the Mac processing power required for these two different input methods? Isn’t it the same data, but perhaps coming in at different rates? Are BMD frames already encoded? Do frames from a USB frame grabber require extra processing on the laptop?

The BMD data comes in through an SDK we can use which has very little overhead. The USB grabbers use Apple’s drivers which seem to be using more resources. Also the USB Bus has less headroom when transmitting video data. We have used USB grabbers for capturing presentations before and that seems to work as you won’t need all the frames.

I’m presuming by keeping MimoLive static (no fades, titles, etc), with one “live” presentor video and one mostly-static PPT input that we are minimizing the MimoLive demands on these older CPU’s.

Of course, image processing is taking up resources, but the most taxing task is actually moving the video through the memory, decoding video sources, encoding the recording and writing it back out to the drive. This activity consumes the most power which is causing some machines to throttle back in performance.

I’m looking forward to hearing about the progress.

@“Oliver (Boinx)” Thanks for the insightful explanation!